Not So Great Britain

Video Game Addiction: a New Diagnosis

June 23, 2007
Leave a Comment

The telltale signs are ominous: teens holing up in their rooms, ignoring friends, family, even food and a shower, while grades plummet and belligerence soars.

The culprit isn’t alcohol or drugs. It’s video games, which for certain kids can be as powerfully addictive as heroin, some doctors contend.

A leading council of the nation’s largest doctors’ group wants to have this behavior officially classified as a psychiatric disorder, to raise awareness and enable sufferers to get insurance coverage for treatment.

In a report prepared for the American Medical Association’s annual policy meeting starting Saturday in Chicago, the council asks the group to lobby for the disorder to be included in a widely used mental illness manual created and published by the American Psychiatric Association. AMA delegates could vote on the proposal as early as Monday.


Virtual worlds ‘could replace real relationships’

June 20, 2007
Leave a Comment

The internet-based virtual world Second Life may have a serious impact on people’s real life relationships, one of Britain’s best-known scientists warned yesterday.Baroness Susan Greenfield, director of the Royal Institution, said she feared users of the popular simulation could abandon the messy intimacy of “real-life” human relations for two-dimensional liaisons in the virtual world.Second Life was started in San Francisco in 1999 and now has seven million players who can create their own characters, known as avatars, buy goods, throw parties and build their own homes.

However, Baroness Greenfield says the implications have not been thought through. “People who dismiss it as a game will be in for a rude awakening,” she said. “This will have a huge impact on society.

“Offering people the chance to have a permanent soap opera going on, in which they can participate, will be even more pervasive than reality TV such as Big Brother.

About author

The author does not say much about himself